Orlando, FL, Physicians Treat Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

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Visit a Trusted GERD Doctor in Orlando, FL

Acid Reflux, also called GERD (Gastroesophageal reflux disease), is a disease of the esophagus in which stomach acid or bile enters the food pipe and irritates its lining. Symptoms include burning pain in the chest. People also refer to this condition as heartburn or acid indigestion. Reflux that happens more than twice a week is more serious than occasional heartburn and is considered GERD.

For some people, GERD symptoms are a dry cough, trouble swallowing, or asthma symptoms.

Many people have occasional acid reflux. Fewer people suffer from its more serious version, GERD. The disease requires that patients manage it intentionally so that the esophagus does not become permanently damaged by acid and result in a serious condition called Barrett’s esophagus.

GERD is treatable by the physicians at Orlando Gastroenterology but can have long-term complications, especially if symptoms are not addressed.

What causes GERD?

There is a valve called the lower esophageal sphincter (the LES) that lies between the stomach and the esophagus. In some people with GERD, that valve becomes weak or damaged. It doesn’t work properly and lets acid up into the esophagus.

Other possible causes of GERD include:

  • Hiatal hernia
  • Pregnancy
  • Smoking
  • Obesity

Identifying GERD

If you have acid reflux regularly—a few times a month or a few times a week—you should visit a doctor. He or she can run tests such as an endoscopy to look at the lining of your esophagus. If test results show that you have GERD, your doctor will create a treatment plan to manage the disease, reduce your discomfort, and avoid long-term damage to your esophagus.

GERD Treatment

An Orlando Gastroenterology doctor may include lifestyle changes, medications, or surgery to treat patients with GERD. Medications may be over-the-counter antacids or prescription drugs that decrease acid production.

Lifestyle changes may include:

  • Stopping smoking
  • Weight loss
  • Eating smaller meals more often
  • Wearing looser clothing
  • Avoiding foods and drinks that make symptoms worse
  • Waiting three hours after eating before lying down
  • Raising the head of the bed six to eight inches

The above information comes from The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), a part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. To ensure that you’re viewing the most up-to-date information, we recommend visiting the gastroesophageal reflux disease entry at the NIDDK website.

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Visit a Trusted GERD Doctor in Orlando, FL

Acid Reflux, also called GERD (Gastroesophageal reflux disease), is a disease of the esophagus in which stomach acid or bile enters the food pipe and irritates its lining. Symptoms include burning pain in the chest. People also refer to this condition as heartburn or acid indigestion. Reflux that happens more than twice a week is more serious than occasional heartburn and is considered GERD.

For some people, GERD symptoms are a dry cough, trouble swallowing, or asthma symptoms.

Many people have occasional acid reflux. Fewer people suffer from its more serious version, GERD. The disease requires that patients manage it intentionally so that the esophagus does not become permanently damaged by acid and result in a serious condition called Barrett’s esophagus.

GERD is treatable by the physicians at Orlando Gastroenterology but can have long-term complications, especially if symptoms are not addressed.

What causes GERD?

There is a valve called the lower esophageal sphincter (the LES) that lies between the stomach and the esophagus. In some people with GERD, that valve becomes weak or damaged. It doesn’t work properly and lets acid up into the esophagus.

Other possible causes of GERD include:

  • Hiatal hernia
  • Pregnancy
  • Smoking
  • Obesity

Identifying GERD

If you have acid reflux regularly—a few times a month or a few times a week—you should visit a doctor. He or she can run tests such as an endoscopy to look at the lining of your esophagus. If test results show that you have GERD, your doctor will create a treatment plan to manage the disease, reduce your discomfort, and avoid long-term damage to your esophagus.

GERD Treatment

An Orlando Gastroenterology doctor may include lifestyle changes, medications, or surgery to treat patients with GERD. Medications may be over-the-counter antacids or prescription drugs that decrease acid production.

Lifestyle changes may include:

  • Stopping smoking
  • Weight loss
  • Eating smaller meals more often
  • Wearing looser clothing
  • Avoiding foods and drinks that make symptoms worse
  • Waiting three hours after eating before lying down
  • Raising the head of the bed six to eight inches

The above information comes from The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), a part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. To ensure that you’re viewing the most up-to-date information, we recommend visiting the gastroesophageal reflux disease entry at the NIDDK website.

Make an Appointment

Name

Date of Birth:

Phone Number

Requested Date of Appointment

Time Requested

Additional Information