Gas and Bloating Treatment in Orlando, FL

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What Orlando Patients Should Know About Gas and Bloating

Everyone has gas. Burping and “passing gas” are normal; they are side effects of digestion. Some people believe they pass gas too often or have too much gas, but this is a rare condition.

Most of the time, gas in the body is odorless. The odor of passed gas comes from sulfur made by bacteria in the large intestine.

Sometimes gas causes bloating and pain. This occurs when gas is trapped in the digestive system and cannot move through the system freely. Most times, gas can be managed by dietary adjustments and over-the-counter medications. Severe gas build-up and pain may, however, be signs of celiac disease or Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).

What can I do about gas?

Changing what you eat and drink can help prevent or reduce gas. You may want to try these strategies before making an appointment at Orlando Gastroenterology.

  1. Cut down on foods that cause gas.

The amount of gas caused by certain foods varies from person to person. Keep track of what you eat and the amount of gas produced. Common gas-producing foods include:

  • beans
  • broccoli, cabbage, brussels sprouts, onions, artichokes, and asparagus
  • pears, apples, and peaches
  • whole grains such as whole wheat and bran
  • soft drinks and fruit drinks
  • milk and milk products such as cheese and ice cream
  • packaged foods that contain lactose, i.e., bread, cereal, and salad dressing
  • dietetic foods and sugar-free candy and gum
  1. Drink plenty of water. Eat clear soup. Avoid carbonated beverages and beer.
  1. Reduce the amount of air you swallow.
  • The consistency of your stool changes
  • You see blood in your stool
  • You have more or less than normal bowel movements
  • Unplanned weight loss
  • Nausea or vomiting that recurs
  • Constipation or diarrhea

  1. Keep a diary.

Write down the foods that seem to produce the most gas. Note the quantities of those foods that you consume. Keep track of the number of times you pass gas each day.

If you are still troubled by gas after implementing the strategies above, see your doctor at Orlando Gastroenterology. Take your diary so that you can discuss eating habits and symptoms with the doctor. He or she may run tests to identify possible Irritable Bowel Syndrome or celiac disease.

What signs are cause for concern?

If you notice any of the signs below, please see one of the physicians at Orlando Gastroenterology:

  • The consistency of your stool changes
  • You see blood in your stool
  • You have more or less than normal bowel movements
  • Unplanned weight loss
  • Nausea or vomiting that recurs
  • Constipation or diarrhea

If you experience chest pain or numbness in your hands or feet that accompanies gas, see a doctor quickly. These can be signs of heart problems.

Make an Appointment

Name

Date of Birth:

Phone Number

Requested Date of Appointment

Time Requested

Additional Information

What Orlando Patients Should Know About Gas and Bloating

Everyone has gas. Burping and “passing gas” are normal; they are side effects of digestion. Some people believe they pass gas too often or have too much gas, but this is a rare condition.

Most of the time, gas in the body is odorless. The odor of passed gas comes from sulfur made by bacteria in the large intestine.

Sometimes gas causes bloating and pain. This occurs when gas is trapped in the digestive system and cannot move through the system freely. Most times, gas can be managed by dietary adjustments and over-the-counter medications. Severe gas build-up and pain may, however, be signs of celiac disease or Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).

What can I do about gas?

Changing what you eat and drink can help prevent or reduce gas. You may want to try these strategies before making an appointment at Orlando Gastroenterology.

  1. Cut down on foods that cause gas.

The amount of gas caused by certain foods varies from person to person. Keep track of what you eat and the amount of gas produced. Common gas-producing foods include:

  • beans
  • broccoli, cabbage, brussels sprouts, onions, artichokes, and asparagus
  • pears, apples, and peaches
  • whole grains such as whole wheat and bran
  • soft drinks and fruit drinks
  • milk and milk products such as cheese and ice cream
  • packaged foods that contain lactose, i.e., bread, cereal, and salad dressing
  • dietetic foods and sugar-free candy and gum
  1. Drink plenty of water. Eat clear soup. Avoid carbonated beverages and beer.
  1. Reduce the amount of air you swallow.
  • The consistency of your stool changes
  • You see blood in your stool
  • You have more or less than normal bowel movements
  • Unplanned weight loss
  • Nausea or vomiting that recurs
  • Constipation or diarrhea

  1. Keep a diary.

Write down the foods that seem to produce the most gas. Note the quantities of those foods that you consume. Keep track of the number of times you pass gas each day.

If you are still troubled by gas after implementing the strategies above, see your doctor at Orlando Gastroenterology. Take your diary so that you can discuss eating habits and symptoms with the doctor. He or she may run tests to identify possible Irritable Bowel Syndrome or celiac disease.

What signs are cause for concern?

If you notice any of the signs below, please see one of the physicians at Orlando Gastroenterology:

  • The consistency of your stool changes
  • You see blood in your stool
  • You have more or less than normal bowel movements
  • Unplanned weight loss
  • Nausea or vomiting that recurs
  • Constipation or diarrhea

If you experience chest pain or numbness in your hands or feet that accompanies gas, see a doctor quickly. These can be signs of heart problems.

Make an Appointment

Name

Date of Birth:

Phone Number

Requested Date of Appointment

Time Requested

Additional Information