Barrett’s Esophagus Treatment Provider in Orlando, FL

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What Orlando Patients Should Know About Barrett's Esophagus

In a person with Barrett’s esophagus, the tissue lining of the esophagus (food pipe) slowly begins to resemble intestinal tissue. This condition occurs in people who suffer from long-term gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), or acid reflux. The cell change in the esophagus is produced as it tries to heal itself from the effects of digestive acids that back up from the stomach. 

A person with Barrett’s esophagus is at risk of developing esophageal cancer. Screenings for this kind of cancer, called adenocarcinoma, are important, as early detection increases the possibility of effective treatment.

How do medical professionals diagnose Barrett's esophagus?

Medical professionals often recommend screening for people who suffer from GERD and acid reflux. The specific screening performed is an upper endoscopy, in which a camera on a small tube is inserted into the esophagus. The medical professional is able to examine the tissue of the esophagus lining and look for abnormalities. A biopsy (the collecting of tissue samples) enables a pathologist to look for dysplasia or early signs of precancerous tissue changes.

Treatment for Barrett's esophagus

Medical professionals treat Barrett’s esophagus to try to prevent the occurrence of cancer. The form of treatment implemented depends on the level of dysplasia present.

High-grade dysplasia usually calls for aggressive treatment such as surgery, freezing the cells (cryotherapy), or destroying cells with light.

Low-grade dysplasia usually results in the scheduling of a follow-up screening six months later.

No dysplasia is of course the best scenario, and doctors usually request patients undergo re-screening in 12 months.

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    What Orlando Patients Should Know About Barrett's Esophagus

    In a person with Barrett’s esophagus, the tissue lining of the esophagus (food pipe) slowly begins to resemble intestinal tissue. This condition occurs in people who suffer from long-term gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), or acid reflux. The cell change in the esophagus is produced as it tries to heal itself from the effects of digestive acids that back up from the stomach. 

    A person with Barrett’s esophagus is at risk of developing esophageal cancer. Screenings for this kind of cancer, called adenocarcinoma, are important, as early detection increases the possibility of effective treatment.

    How do medical professionals diagnose Barrett's esophagus?

    Medical professionals often recommend screening for people who suffer from GERD and acid reflux. The specific screening performed is an upper endoscopy, in which a camera on a small tube is inserted into the esophagus. The medical professional is able to examine the tissue of the esophagus lining and look for abnormalities. A biopsy (the collecting of tissue samples) enables a pathologist to look for dysplasia or early signs of precancerous tissue changes.

    Treatment for Barrett's esophagus

    Medical professionals treat Barrett’s esophagus to try to prevent the occurrence of cancer. The form of treatment implemented depends on the level of dysplasia present.

    High-grade dysplasia usually calls for aggressive treatment such as surgery, freezing the cells (cryotherapy), or destroying cells with light.

    Low-grade dysplasia usually results in the scheduling of a follow-up screening six months later.

    No dysplasia is of course the best scenario, and doctors usually request patients undergo re-screening in 12 months.

    Make an Appointment

      Name

      Date of Birth:

      Phone Number

      Requested Date of Appointment

      Time Requested

      Additional Information